Winter Care
Some animals can remain outside longer in the winter than others. In some cases, long-haired breeds like Huskies will do better in cold weather than short-haired breeds like Dachshunds. Cats and small dogs will feel the cold sooner than larger animals shoulder-deep in the snow. Your pet's health will also affect how long she can stay out. Conditions like diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, and hormonal imbalances can compromise a pet's ability to regulate her own body heat. Animals that are not generally in good health shouldn't be exposed to winter weather for a long period of time. Very young and very old animals are vulnerable to the cold as well. No pet should stay outside for long periods of time in freezing cold weather. If you have any questions about how long your pet should be out this winter, ask your veterinarian.

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Grooming – benefits for you and your pet
Dog grooming and health go hand in hand. Good grooming makes your pet look good and there are physiological as well as psychological health benefits for your companion. Much of dog grooming takes place at home so it is advisable to begin dog grooming while the puppy is very young. Brushing your dog thoroughly every day is an important part of good hygiene. Your dog should be trained to accept grooming at an early age.

It is best to proceed slowly at the beginning, giving him lots of praises when he submits to you. He also has to learn to sit still or lie on his side. Dog grooming keeps the dog's skin healthy and coat glossy. It helps to improve the blood circulation, keeps the coat free of ticks and other less welcome visitors. It also offers a good bonding time for owner and dog. In the natural world, dogs lick each other and groom each other. This reinforces pack behavior and subordination. Grooming the dog for 10-20 minutes every day or as often as necessary will bring the dog immeasurably closer to you, while keeping him healthy.

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